Preworn Levi’s jeans from 1880s found in mine sold for $87,000

A used pair of Levi’s jeans from the 1880s discovered in an abandoned mine shaft has sold for $87,000 at an auction in New Mexico.

The jeans, found in the mine a few years ago, were bought by two men – Kyle Hautner and Zip Stevenson – for more than $75,000 plus a 15% buyer’s premium. Stevenson owns a vintage denim store in Los Angeles.

The two men placed their bid at the Durango Vintage Festivus.

The pants, with frayed hems, signs of fading, paint stains and multiple holes, are still wearable despite their poor shape, Stevenson said. There are a few similar jeans but they remain in museums and are too delicate to wear.

Also Read :  Job aspirants condemn Odisha govt's move to re-appoint retired officials

WAWA CLOSES TWO STORES IN PHILADELPHIA WITHIN RETAIL CRIME IN TOWN

Levi's jeans found in the mine shaft

A used pair of Levi’s jeans discovered in an abandoned mine shaft has sold for $87,000 at an auction in New Mexico. (Instagram/denimdoctors)

Stevenson said offers from a private buyer would be considered, but he would prefer to buy the jeans and display them in a museum such as the Smithsonian or the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The jeans are currently stored in a safe in Los Angeles. People can view the jeans by booking an appointment at Stevenson’s store.

The jeans have a 38 inch waist and a 32 inch length. They are an artifact of the nation’s troubled history.

E-BIKES SOLD ON AMAZON, RECALL WALMART DUE TO FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD

Printed on the inside of one pocket of the pants are the words “The only kind made by White Labor,” a reference to the increasing anti-Chinese rhetoric of the period.

“An economic crisis in the United States in [the] The 1870s brought high unemployment and fueled anti-Chinese sentiment and rampant discrimination,” a spokesman for Levi Strauss & Co. said in a statement to NPR. “When Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882, there was significant social pressure not to hire Chinese workers and LS&Co. introduced an anti-Chinese labor policy.

China’s Exclusion Act banned Chinese workers from entering the United States for a decade.

Levi’s had marketed its clothing as “made by white labor” because it believed it would increase sales by conforming to the views of Americans at the time.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ABOUT FOX BUSINESS

The company spokesman said there have been times when the company has “failed to live up to” its commitment to “be a positive force for equality and racial justice.” Levi’s reversed labor policies in the 1890s.

Source

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.